Scientists capture real image of Coronavirus infected Blood Vessel

Coronavirus

A team of Chinese scientists released real images of Coronavirus infecting a blood vessel. As per the team, the virus looks exactly like it would survive in nature. Freeze fracture technique images of the virus show clumps of COVID 19 inside a blood vessel.

WHO Updates on Coronavirus

The images with ultrastructure morphology of COVID 19 had been released earlier. But real images have surfaced from a southern Chinese lab today. WHO has been constantly monitoring and updating about the outbreak. With the most recent updates from WHO, being about the difference between influenza and Coronavirus.

Also Read: Coronavirus can hit you through your phones. Steps to prevent!

How was the real image of COVID 19 captured?

The freeze-fracture technique involves using liquid nitrogen or freezing agents to solidify the sample. Following the step, the sample is cut open. One can see the surfaces and a partial 3D view of the sample observed. However, the images released are 2D and high phase contrast picture of Coronavirus.

Coronavirus Cure or Vaccine

A promising step in the direction of finding a cure, observing real COVID 19 is a breakthrough. Now it is possible to study how the virus infects and spreads the infection. Parallel to the studies of the viral plague, travel cautions and death toll due to COVID 19 has been rising. Across the globe, new cases have been reported. A lot of myths and panic are also creating ruckus and impeding the steps taken.

Also Read: Coronavirus Vaccine can take a year to complete, Says US govt

Upon establishing the life cycle of the virus a vaccine for COVID-19 can be formulated. Scientists had inactivated the strain of Coronavirus to see a real image. Since the images were as predicted for a virus with nucleocapsid and spikes in nature, it seems a cure is near. Various images have been doing rounds on the Internet but were just schematic. Either graphic or representational images were available before Sunday, 8 March.

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